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Curating Interdisciplinarity in Literature-Art: a Review of Mukhaputa

Srajana Kaikini

Research Scholar (PhD), Manipal Centre for Philosophy and Humanities, Manipal University, Karnataka. ORCID: 0000-0002-1955-5482. Email: srajanakaikini@gmail.com

    Volume 10, Number 2, 2018 I Full Text PDF

DOI: 10.21659/rupkatha.v10n2.24

Received October 30, 2017; Revised February 28, 2018; Accepted March 20, 2018; Published May 26, 2018.

Abstract

This is a philosophical review of the exhibition dedicated to Literature – Art titled Mukhaputa (Cover page) held on occasion of the Manipal International Literature and Arts Platform 2017 in Manipal, India. The curatorial strategy of the exhibition explores the intersectional relationships between literature and visual arts at large. The context of this critical review is the recent past of modern literature journals in print that encouraged artists and illustrators to converse with literature and in turn poets and authors to be artists in their own right. Through a reflection on the nature of new forms of art works submitted by various artists to the exhibition, the review situates new methods of interdisciplinary curating which is highly contingent and speculative. Curation, thus, demands a new reading in terms of its role in interdisciplinary creative practice.

Keywords: Curatorial philosophy, interdisciplinarity, literature, arts, illustration, literature-art

Frankenstein’s Avatars: Posthuman monstrosities in Indian science fiction cinema

Abhishek V. Lakkad
Doctoral Research Candidate, Centre for Studies in Science, Technology and Innovation Policy (CSSTIP), School of Social Sciences, Central University of Gujarat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat. ORCID: 0000-0002-0330-0661. Email: abhishek.lakkad@gmail.com

    Volume 10, Number 2, 2018 I Full Text PDF

DOI: 10.21659/rupkatha.v10n2.23

Received January 31, 2018; Revised April 22, 2018; Accepted May 19, 2018; Published May 26, 2018.

Abstract

This paper engages with ‘Frankenstein’ as a narrative structure in Indian popular cinema, in the context of posthumanism. Scholarship pertaining to monsters/monstrosity in Indian films has generally been addressed within the horror genre. However, the present paper aspires to understand monstrosity by locating its origins in science and technology through Frankenstein-like characters, thus shifting the locus of examining monstrosity from the usual confines of horror to the domain of science fiction. The paper contends Enthiran/Robot (Shankar 2010 Tamil/Hindi) as an emblematic instance of posthuman monstrosity that employs a Frankenstein narrative. The paper hopes to bring out the significance of cinematic imagination concerning posthuman monsters, to engage with collective social fears and anxieties about various cutting-edge technologies as well as other socio-cultural concerns at the interface of science, technology, body and the society/nation.

Keywords: Frankenstein, Posthumanism, Monstrosity, Indian popular cinema, Science Fiction

What made the Monster? Lack of Communicative Competence & Communication

Taejin Koh

Associate Professor, Department of Hindi, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, Korea. Orcid: 0000-0002-9025-800X. Email: tjindia@naver.com

    Volume 10, Number 2, 2018 I Full Text PDF

DOI: 10.21659/rupkatha.v10n2.22

Received January 14, 2018; Revised April 20, 2018; Accepted April 30, 2018; Published May 26, 2018.

Abstract

This paper attempts to interpret Mary Shelly’s Frankenstein from a linguistic point of view. In other words, it discusses why a creature was forced to become the monster with a perspective of communicative competence. The first part of the paper briefly describes Mary Shelly’s family background and talks about linguistic points. The second part analyses the relationship between the monster and his language in relation to the learning process of the language. It also elaborates about the communicative competence. Mary Shelley might pose us a question through the monster’s experience: how his relationship with humans should be based on communication? Then the third part gives us the idea that how this tragic story unfolds Victor Frankenstein’s complete alienation from the society. It seems that Mary Shelley has already warned people of the danger of a lone wolf with scientific advances. In conclusion, the paper stresses the importance of communicative competence based on the frame of the style.

Keywords: Frankenstein, communication, communicative competence, linguistic competence, monster

More Horrible than the Monster: Social Antagonism and Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

Ghiasuddin Alizadeh

PhD candidate of English Literature, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran.

Orcid: 0000-0002-4119-2251. Email: Ghiasuddin.alizadeh@gmail.com

  Volume 10, Number 2, 2018 I Full Text PDF

DOI: 10.21659/rupkatha.v10n2.19

Received January 15, 2017; Revised May 21, 2018; Accepted May 22, 2018; Published May 26, 2018.

Abstract

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein has often been considered as a political novel and an attempt to account for the dire consequences of the failure of the French Revolution. However, contrary to the common vogue for identifying Frankenstein’s monster with the negative dimensions of political and revolutionary movements, a careful reading of the novel reveals a deeper problem hidden behind the figure of the monster. This study is an attempt to read Frankenstein in the light of the politico-psychoanalytical ideas of Slavoj Žižek in an attempt to prove the fact that the monster is Mary Shelley’s fantasy construction in order to conceal the ontological antagonism which marks the socio-symbolic order. By drawing on Žižek’s concept of fantasy and its role in obfuscating the fundamental inconsistency of the Other, the research has tried to disentangle the world of the novel from the horrible presence of the monster, by bringing to light a more frightening horror against which the monster turns out to be a protective screen, namely, the horror of the Real.

Keywords: fantasy; French Revolution; the Real; the monster

Frankenstein and Ackroyd: a Study of the Text as the Monster

Anish Bhattacharyya

Assistant Professor, Department of English Language and Literature, Adamas University.
Orcid: 0000-0001-8104-2752. Email: anishbhattacharyya@gmail.com

   Volume 10, Number 2, 2018 I Full Text PDF

DOI: 10.21659/rupkatha.v10n2.21

Received January 16, 2017; Revised May 20, 2018; Accepted May 21, 2018; Published May 26, 2018.

 Abstract

There have been several retellings of the Frankenstein narrative since its publication. Peter Ackroyd’s rendition of the same was published in 2008 under the title, The Casebook of Victor Frankenstein. The text attempts to look at Mary Shelley’s narrative from a different perspective, rather than simply reiterating the events in a familiar way. It employs the historical fictional mode of storytelling. This paper attempts to study the role of Ackroyd as a reader, author and manipulator of history. It will also strive to understand the politics behind Ackroyd’s attempted resurrection of Shelley, Byron, Polidori and Mary Shelley as his characters. The goal is to comprehend, how Ackroyd’s voice functions within this cacophony of voices.

Keywords: rhizome, author, reader, historiographic metafiction, discourse, unreliability.

‘Filthy creation’: the Problem of Parenting in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

Debapriya Goswami

Assistant Professor of English, Department of Basic Science and English, NSHM Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Durgapur. Orcid: 0000-0002-6801-0083. Email: dg81186@gmail.com

  Volume 10, Number 2, 2018 I Full Text PDF

DOI: 10.21659/rupkatha.v10n2.20

Abstract

This paper is an attempt to bolster the relevance of Mary Shelley’s classic Frankenstein by engaging contemporary bioethical discourses on procreation and parenting. It claims that, besides being a celebrated science fiction for the last two centuries, the novel bears pensive suggestions on parenthood. Exploring the ways in which the creature suffers in the hands of its creator, the paper argues that Frankenstein anticipates the need for an ethics of parenthood. The paper discusses the deficiency in Frankenstein’s parenting, as it seeks to reread his position vis-à-vis his creation. In recent times, parenthood and procreation have been a major bioethical concern. By presenting the views of contemporary philosophers on parenthood, the paper unfolds Shelley’s ingenuity in staging the disturbing ramifications of imprudent parenting on children as early as in the nineteenth century. The paper, hence, is an effort to underscore the contemporaneity of Shelley’s ideas on parental choices which she proficiently enfolds in the narrative of a gothic fiction.

Keywords: Frankenstein, Mary Shelley, parenting, bioethics, procreation.

More Horrible than the Monster: Social Antagonism and Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

Ghiasuddin Alizadeh

PhD candidate of English Literature, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran.

Orcid: 0000-0002-4119-2251. Email: Ghiasuddin.alizadeh@gmail.com

  Volume 10, Number 2, 2018 I Full Text PDF

DOI: 10.21659/rupkatha.v10n2.19

Received January 15, 2017; Revised May 21, 2018; Accepted May 22, 2018; Published May 26, 2018.

Abstract

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein has often been considered as a political novel and an attempt to account for the dire consequences of the failure of the French Revolution. However, contrary to the common vogue for identifying Frankenstein’s monster with the negative dimensions of political and revolutionary movements, a careful reading of the novel reveals a deeper problem hidden behind the figure of the monster. This study is an attempt to read Frankenstein in the light of the politico-psychoanalytical ideas of Slavoj Žižek in an attempt to prove the fact that the monster is Mary Shelley’s fantasy construction in order to conceal the ontological antagonism which marks the socio-symbolic order. By drawing on Žižek’s concept of fantasy and its role in obfuscating the fundamental inconsistency of the Other, the research has tried to disentangle the world of the novel from the horrible presence of the monster, by bringing to light a more frightening horror against which the monster turns out to be a protective screen, namely, the horror of the Real.

Keywords: fantasy; French Revolution; the Real; the monster

‘I know I will hear what I heard before:’ The Role of Music in Narrative Progression

Andrea Pérez Mukdsi

University of North Georgia, U.S.A. Orcid ID 0000-0003-3922-1073. Andrea. Email: PerezMukdsi@ung.edu

Received November 01, 2017; Accepted March 25, 2018; Published May 24, 2018.

  Volume 10, Number 2, 2018 I Full Text PDF

DOI: 10.21659/rupkatha.v10n2.17a

Abstract

This article constitutes an initial approach to the analysis of musical instances as narrative progression-related marks. For this purpose, I examine the short “Meeting” (1966) by the Argentine writer Julio Cortázar using the notions of instability and tension coined by James Phelan. I show in what way the story-discourse model of these texts uses various musical elements that produce a high/low degree of character presence/reader immediacy within the narrative progression. Ambiguity represents one of Cortázar’s characteristic traits, due to the fact that instabilities are seldom resolved in the story and tensions are left to the reader’s empathetic constructions. I argue that the musical material that either motivates or comes forth from this text is the force that shifts the narrative away from ambiguities and propels the character and reader forward through the absence of closure and completeness that is frequent in most Cortázar’s narratives.

  Keywords: Julio Cortázar, Mozart, music, narratology

Frames, Vanishing Points and Blindness: Frankenstein and the Field of Vision

Will Greenshields

Independent Researcher.  ORCID: 0000-0003-1464-7182. Email: willgreenshields88@gmail.com

 Volume 10, Number 2, 2018 I Full Text PDF

DOI: 10.21659/rupkatha.v10n2.18

Received January 14, 2017; Revised March 14, 2018; Accepted April 02, 2018; Published May 18, 2018.

Abstract

Whilst the preponderance of references made in Frankenstein to the instruments and organs of the visual field has been repeatedly acknowledged by the text’s readers, little sustained attention has been paid to the field that these instruments and organs both construct and occupy. In this paper we will examine the particularity of this field, outlining its structure (the vanishing points and framing), content (its peculiarities and obscurities) and subjects (their modes of witnessing and blindness). Opening with an analysis of Walton’s visual field qua desirous fantasy in light of his reference to “keeping”, we closely study the visual fields constructed by the artistic, scientific and profane eyes of Shelley, Frankenstein, Clerval and the monster.

Keywords: Frankenstein, aesthetics, ethics.

Khortha, a Dying Language and Urgency to Retain its Pure Variety

Swati Priya1 & Rajni Singh2

1Research Scholar, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, IIT(ISM) Dhanbad. Email: swati.jha@hotmail.com

2Associate Professor of English, IIT(ISM) Dhanbad, India. Email: rajnisingh18@gmail.com.

  Volume 10, Number 2, 2018 I Full Text PDF

DOI: 10.21659/rupkatha.v10n2.17

Received February 09, 2017; Revised March 15, 2018; Accepted April 05, 2018; Published May 07, 2018.

 Abstract

Languages are repositories of history, they express identity and contribute to the sum of human knowledge. (David Crystal, 2000). The linguistic diversity is really a benchmark of cultural diversity. Language, knowledge and culture are intricately woven. If a language is lost, the knowledge and cultural aspects of that community becomes extinct.   The present study discusses about language death and the factors that leads to the language death in the world and in India. The prime focus of the study is to consider Khortha, a tribal language being spoken in Jharkhand and its neighboring states, as an endangered language. Khortha is fading away and is on the verge of losing its identity, the paper hence discusses some of the preventive measures to revitalize the language and safeguard it from getting extinct. The study has been presented through the data collected from the communities living in the outskirts of Dhanbad and the linguistic variation has been shown based on various parameters.

Keywords: Language death, tribal language, language revitalization, linguistic variation